India Architecture

India Architecture

Asia

Among the emerging nations, India is the fastest growing one; it is expected that in a relatively short time it will be able to keep pace with the most advanced economies, leaving behind its current position among developing countries. Its recent evolution has been so significant that, according to recent estimates, by the mid-21st century it would be about to overtake China in terms of urbanization and demographic size, becoming the most populous country in the world with about 1.6 billions of residents. Its lively economy will, however, make it possible for the government, by 2016, to further accelerate the modernization process already underway, with investments equal to 1 trillion dollars in new infrastructures.

The construction market has also seen growth of exceptional proportions, to the point that today India is considered the second largest construction industry in the world after China. The country is therefore at a crucial moment in its history: on the one hand it will constitute one of the major experimentation sites on the city in the near future, on the other it will be forced to deal with the serious problem of electricity shortages, if it wants to avoid become the economy with the greatest energy dependency.

Among the many large Indian cities, we note Bangalore, the capital of Karnataka and a scientific center of excellence, which concentrates the main high-tech companies: about one third of the million employees that the information technology companies work there. they boast as a whole within a nation that, since the end of the 20th century, has been among the world leaders of the digital revolution. The city is home to over 8 million residents, thus ranking third among the Indian metropolises, after Mumbai (which exceeds 18 million, see) and Delhi (which exceeds 16 million). Predictably, it is also one of the cities where contemporary architectural experimentation appears particularly interesting, especially in the residential and university sectors. For India 1996, please check pharmacylib.com.

In such a scenario, despite the 170 schools of architecture (of which only one out of five is public), there is obviously ample space for different designers and consultants, which the country calls, even from abroad, to confront themselves on the complex and contradictory scene. of its contemporaneity. Among the most important figures of the local architectural panorama stand out masters such as Balkrishna Vithaldas Doshi (b.1927), Charles Correa (1930-2015), Raj Rewal (b.1934) and Hasmukh Chandubhai Patel (b.1933). In search of a meeting point between local traditions and international stylistic features, the most recent and qualified architectural production includes: Terminal 2 of the Chhatrapati Shivaji international airport (2014) by the US studio SOM (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill) in Mumbai; L’ M-auditorium (2014) of Planet 3 Studios Architecture, again in Mumbai; the headquarters of Digit (2014), one of the largest communications companies in the country, the work of the Anagram studio in New Delhi; the ITM School of business (2013) campus of M: OFA in Gwalior; the Vivanta hotel (2013) by WOW Architects in Gurgaon; the Myra School of business (2012), by Architecture Paradigm, in Mysore; the Cuboid House (2012) by Amit Khan na Design Associates in New Delhi; the Bajaj science education center (2010), by CCBA (Christopher Charles Benninger Architects), at Wardha in Maharash between. Finally, among the most recent and unusual examples, the headquarters of the historic Bombay Art society built in 2009 in Mumbai by Sanjay Puri should be noted: it is characterized by sinuous wall surfaces in ferrocement and large windows with an original shading system inside the double glazing.

India Architecture